ENGL 4920

ENGL 4920

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2020-2021.

The purpose of the Honors Seminar is to acquaint students with methods of study and research to help them write their senior Honors Essay. However, all interested students are welcome to enroll. The seminar will require a substantial essay that incorporates literary evidence and critical material effectively, and develops an argument. Topics and instructors vary each semester. For Spring 2021, the topic for section 101 will be The Jazz Age, and the topic for section 102 will be Race, Class, Gender, and Violence.

When Offered Spring.

Permission Note Enrollment preference given to: students in the Honors Program in English or related fields.

Distribution Category (ALC-AS)
Satisfies Requirement Either ENGL 4910 or ENGL 4920 is required for students pursuing an honors degree in English.

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: The Jazz Age

  •  6267ENGL 4920  SEM 101

    • WOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Hutchinson, G

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This course will focus on the literature and culture of the “Jazz Age,” with a special focus on the mixture of “high” and “low” cultures, ethnic and racial mixing and matching, and testing of the mores governing gender and sexuality in the period roughly from the end of World War I to the mid-1930s. Most of the course will focus on literary texts, including a number that use or refer to jazz music, but we will also learn some things about early jazz itself and its musicians and clubs, and about the art of the period. The course is organized by genre, and will include discussion of various kinds of modernist experimentation in the visual arts as well as fiction, drama, and poetry.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Race, Class, Gender, and Violence

  •  8419ENGL 4920  SEM 102

    • ROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ngugi, M

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    The class counts toward the pre-1800 requirement for English majors. Ideas change the world. Sometimes the same ideas can do tremendous good and also cause great suffering. In this course we will consider violence and revolutionary changes through the prism of British 17th and 18th century Enlightenment thought. Thinking through the writings of Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Mary Wollstonecraft and others, we will explore the ways in which the brilliance and blind spots of Enlightenment thinking influenced contemporary notions of race, class, gender and changed the world.