ENGL 4920

ENGL 4920

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2019-2020.

The purpose of the Honors Seminar is to acquaint students with methods of study and research to help them write their senior Honors Essay. However, all interested students are welcome to enroll. The seminar will require a substantial essay that incorporates literary evidence and critical material effectively, and develops an argument. Topics and instructors vary each semester.

When Offered Spring.

Permission Note Enrollment preference given to: students in the Honors Program in English or related fields.

Satisfies Requirement Either ENGL 4910 or ENGL 4920 is required for students pursuing an honors degree in English.

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Archaeology of the Text: Chaucer to Shakespeare

  •  7366ENGL 4920  SEM 101

  • Instruction Mode: Hybrid - Online & In Person
    This seminar will explore and write about “works” and “texts,” as well as archives and editions. We will focus on manuscripts, handwriting, books, literacy, printers, editing theory, reception, and related issues (authorship, literary form, and broader cultural history). We will un-edit the editions we read, exploring and learning to read ourselves what they are based on, and making new texts as well as learning to read old ones. Emphasis will be on a crucial period of English literature and culture: from Chaucer to Shakespeare; from manuscript-culture to print culture; from medieval to early modern.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Virginia Woolf

  • 17705ENGL 4920  SEM 102

  • Instruction Mode: Hybrid - Online & In Person
    This course will introduce students to one of the iconic writers of the twentieth century who boldly experimented with novelistic techniques to create forms answerable to modern life and who wrote powerful, engaged literary and political criticism to challenge the dominance of patriarchal and imperial traditions and institutions. In reading a selection of Woolf’s fiction and essays, we will examine how her narratives explore new senses of consciousness, time, and identity, and the social-historical significance suffusing ordinary events and everyday life, as well as questions of war, violence and trauma, sexuality and gender, and aesthetics. Fiction includes: To the Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, Orlando, The Waves, short stories; non-fiction: A Room of One’s Own, Three Guineas, literary essays.