GOVT 1901

GOVT 1901

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2015-2016.

Weekly informal discussion of urgent public issues posed by a central theme, such as inequality, foreign policy and immigration, or challenges to liberty and democracy. Recent public lectures organized by Ethics and Public Life, brief initial presentations by Cornell researchers, or brief debates between participants are typical starting-points for conversations reflecting diverse perspectives.

When Offered Spring.

Comments Variable credit available: 1 credit S/U for regular participation; 2 credits, S/U or letter, for two short papers.

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: GOVT 1901PHIL 1901SOC 1900

  • 1 Credit Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Inequalities: How Deep? Why? What Should Be Done?

  • 18780GOVT 1901  SEM 101

  • This semester's theme will be inequalities in the United States, political, economic, racial, social and educational. How deep do they run? What are the effects? What are the causes? Why do they matter? What should be done? We will be engaging with current research on these issues, including six public lectures during the semester (also accessible online) by leading figures in the study of inequality. There will also be brief presentations by Cornell researchers and brief initial debates. The course will emphasize conversation among participants, reflecting diverse perspectives.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: GOVT 1901PHIL 1901SOC 1900

  • 2 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Inequalities: How Deep? Why? What Should Be Done?

  • 18781GOVT 1901  SEM 102

  • Two brief papers, of six to eight pages, will be required. This semester's theme will be inequalities in the United States, political, economic, racial, social and educational. How deep do they run? What are the effects? What are the causes? Why do they matter? What should be done? We will be engaging with current research on these issues, including six public lectures during the semester (also accessible online) by leading figures in the study of inequality. There will also be brief presentations by Cornell researchers and brief initial debates. The course will emphasize conversation among participants, reflecting diverse perspectives.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: GOVT 1901PHIL 1901SOC 1900

  • 1 Credit Sat/Unsat

  • Topic: Inequalities: How Deep? Why? What Should Be Done?

  • 18845GOVT 1901  SEM 103

  • This semester's theme will be inequalities in the United States, political, economic, racial, social and educational. How deep do they run? What are the effects? What are the causes? Why do they matter? What should be done? We will be engaging with current research on these issues, including six public lectures during the semester (also accessible online) by leading figures in the study of inequality. There will also be brief presentations by Cornell researchers and brief initial debates. The course will emphasize conversation among participants, reflecting diverse perspectives.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: GOVT 1901PHIL 1901SOC 1900

  • 2 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Inequalities: How Deep? Why? What Should Be Done?

  • 18846GOVT 1901  SEM 104

  • Two brief papers, of six to eight pages, will be required. This semester's theme will be inequalities in the United States, political, economic, racial, social and educational. How deep do they run? What are the effects? What are the causes? Why do they matter? What should be done? We will be engaging with current research on these issues, including six public lectures during the semester (also accessible online) by leading figures in the study of inequality. There will also be brief presentations by Cornell researchers and brief initial debates. The course will emphasize conversation among participants, reflecting diverse perspectives.