ENGL 2880

ENGL 2880

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2020-2021.

This course offers guidance and an audience for students who wish to gain skill in expository writing—a common term for critical, reflective, investigative, and creative nonfiction. Each section provides a context for writing defined by a form of exposition, a disciplinary area, a practice, or a topic intimately related to the written medium. Course members will read in relevant published material and write and revise their own work regularly, while reviewing and responding to one another's. Students and instructors will confer individually throughout the term. Topics differ for each section.

When Offered Fall.

Prerequisites/Corequisites Prerequisite: completion of First-Year Writing Seminar requirement or permission of the instructor.

Distribution Category (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Satisfies Requirement This course satisfies requirements for the English minor but not for the English major. Taken with the instructor's permission, it satisfies First-Year Writing Seminar requirements for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. If counted toward the First-Year Writing Seminar requirement, the course will not count toward LA-AS or ALC-AS.

Comments ENGL 2880 is not a prerequisite for ENGL 2890. For descriptions of each topic, please visit the course website.

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: New and Old Media: Books in the Digital Age

  •  4457ENGL 2880  SEM 101

    • MWFOnline Meeting
    • Sep 2 - Dec 16, 2020
    • Lu, B

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    How do the form and structure of our books affect what we know and how we take it in? We live in a moment in which digital technologies are disrupting and expanding our definitions and uses of books, and, more importantly, the way we imagine and practice reading and writing. Students in this course will be asked to think about the ways in which the structure and design of a book encourage some ways of using it while limiting others. We’ll explore these issues using many approaches, including creative and analytical writing assignments and hands-on workshops on topics like papermaking, letterpress and/or block printing, bookbinding, and digital print technologies.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: American Nightmare: Horror Films and Fictions

  •  4458ENGL 2880  SEM 102

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Sep 2 - Dec 16, 2020
    • Barnes, R

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    Why do we like to be afraid? What kind of fear is intrinsically American and why? From the early fear of the cultural “other” in Universal Classic Monsters to the Satanic Panic of the 60s and 70s in Rosemary’s Baby to Cold War paranoia and unchecked consumer culture in Romero’s Trilogy of the Dead to contemporary race relations in Get Out, this course seeks to understand how horror films speak to, and perhaps against, our country’s past, present and, future. Possible texts may also include Poe short stories, works by Stephen King and Shirley Jackson, and Ling Ma's Severance. Assignments will include critical essays, written creative projects, and the making of a short-length horror screenplay as a final project.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Creative Nonfiction: Exploring the Personal Essay

  •  6047ENGL 2880  SEM 103

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Sep 2 - Dec 16, 2020
    • Green, C

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    In this course, we will read and write personal essays, exploring the various possibilities within the genre. We will explore the power of image and specific detail, the uses and limits of the first-person narrating self, and the boundary between public and private. Reading will focus on contemporary essayists, possibly including Leslie Jamison, Eula Biss, and Alexander Chee; we will also read older essays, including those of Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, and James Baldwin. We will also pay close attention to students' writing, with workshop feedback. Working through drafts, students will develop fuller skill at criticism and revision.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Creative Nonfiction: Writing from the Margins

  •  6583ENGL 2880  SEM 104

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Sep 2 - Dec 16, 2020
    • Asi, A

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    The personal essay can be a powerful tool with which to excavate and examine our lives. Writers have used it to center and communicate lived experience from the margins, dealing with themes of empire, sexuality, race, gender and class made personal and specific. In this course students will be inspired by classic and contemporary writers like Gloria Anzaldúa, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Rachel Cusk, Kiese Laymon, Leslie Jamison and Carmen Maria Machado. The class will be generative and skill-based. Students will learn how to harness introspection, develop their own voice, observe vivid detail, discover their themes and characters, and use structure, setting, expressive language and research to communicate their stories.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Photography and Trauma:Legal and Med. Perspectives

  • 17735ENGL 2880  SEM 105

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Sep 2 - Dec 16, 2020
    • Srbinovski, B

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    Through the camera people become customers or tourists of reality, the American critic Susan Sontag once remarked. Why do we feel the need to capture the suffering of others in the form of a photograph, when we know an image cannot do justice to the violence that we see? And why does the language of photography–like that of flashbacks–insert itself into the writing of traumatic testimony? Drawing on court cases, crime reports, medical histories, and news stories from the last thirty years, we will interrogate the command that photography and trauma have come to have of the truth.