ENGL 4910

ENGL 4910

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2018-2019. Courses of Study 2019-2020 is scheduled to publish mid-June.

The purpose of the Honors Seminar is to acquaint students with methods of study and research to help them write their senior Honors Essay. However, all interested students are welcome to enroll. The seminar will require a substantial essay that incorporates literary evidence and critical material effectively, and develops an argument. Topics and instructors vary each semester.

When Offered Fall.

Permission Note Enrollment limited to: students in the Honors Program in English or related fields, or by permission of instructor.

Satisfies Requirement Seminar 101 may be used as one of three pre-1800 courses required of English majors.

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Oscar Wilde

  •  6220ENGL 4910  SEM 101

    • M
    • Hanson, E

  • “I was a man who stood in symbolic relations to the art and culture of my age,” Oscar Wilde once announced in a characteristically immodest, yet accurate, appraisal of his talent. With his legendary wit, his exuberant style of perversity and paradox, and his tendency to scandal, he has come to stand in symbolic relation to our own age as well, and for some of the same reasons he was a delight and a challenge to the Victorians. We will explore his poetry, essays, plays, letters, and fiction, in the context of the Aesthetic, Decadent, and Symbolist movements of the late-nineteenth century and also in the context of current debates in literary criticism and the history of sexuality.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Moving Stories:Fictions of Migration

  •  7149ENGL 4910  SEM 102

    • T
    • Brady, M

  • This course will study recent novels about migration and life as a refugee. We will read novels by authors writing about migration in and from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia as well as a few canonical novels about migration such as Willa Cather’s My Antonia and Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon. As part of our course work we will also carefully study the visual art of global migration in conjunction with a special exhibit on migration at the Johnson. We will ask how movement shapes the moves a novelist makes and how visual artists approach the problem of forced migration differently from writers.