CHEME 6640

CHEME 6640

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2018-2019.

Qualitatively and quantitatively examines the evolving role of energy in economic development and activity at local, regional and global levels. Facilitates an understanding of the key and diverse drivers of energy supply and demand. Reviews energy markets and how they function – oil, gas, electricity, renewables. Reviews pricing and forecasting methods. Focuses on the economic methods of assessing diverse energy technologies/projects – renewable and non-renewable. Examines the key drivers of energy resource substitution (why is one fuel chosen over another). Analyzes the dynamic relationship between economic activity, energy and the environment. Both lecture and case-based approach.

When Offered Fall.

Permission Note Enrollment preference given in the following order: students in the M.Eng. Energy Economics and Engineering Concentration (EEE), ChemE M.Eng. program students, ChemE seniors, other M.Eng. programs followed by graduate students and seniors from other disciplines.

Course Attribute (CU-SBY)

Outcomes
  • Understand energy's role in economic activity and development.
  • Be able to evaluate energy projects with a keen understanding of economic methods and project assumptions.
  • Be able to understand the structure and dynamics of key energy markets.
  • Understand the impact of energy on society and vice versa.
  • Develop a view on the environmental aspects of the use of energy and its effect on energy economics.

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • 10851CHEME 6640  LEC 001

  • Prerequisites: The course does not assume any background in economics although the motivation to quickly grasp basic micro/macroeconomics will be helpful in benefiting from this course. Early admit M.Eng. students must take CHEME 6640 in the first semester of the senior year. Enrollment preference given in the following order: students in the M.Eng. Energy Economics and Engineering Concentration (EEE), ChemE MEng program students, ChemE seniors, other M.Eng. programs, followed by graduate students and seniors from other disciplines.