LAW 6027

Course information provided by the Courses of Study 2017-2018.

This course is offered to students interested in acquiring the knowledge, skills and techniques necessary to mediate interpersonal disputes. In the first segment of the course, students will be introduced to the guiding principles of interpersonal mediation. A review of the theories of conflict, its roots and its resolution, set the stage for the role mediation can effectively play in resolving conflict. Students are introduced to the models of mediation and the benefits and challenges of each, including a comparative analysis of evaluative, facilitative and transformative styles of mediation. In the second segment, students will be assigned to mediate cases referred to the Scheinman Institute from the Office of the Judicial Administrator. The role of gender, race, culture, ethics and impasse in mediation will all be examined and incorporated into workshops and case studies. Students will have several opportunities to apply their knowledge of mediation and acquire the skills necessary to become effective mediators. Following each case assignment, students will be required to write a paper analyzing the nature of the complaint, the approach and techniques employed during the case and the student's evaluation of what worked and did not work in their attempt to resolve the conflict. Oversight will be provided by the course instructors.

When Offered Fall, spring.

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Combined with: ILRLR 4027ILRLR 6027

  • 3 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16361LAW 6027  LEC 001

  • This course is offered to students interested in acquiring the knowledge, skills and techniques necessary to mediate interpersonal disputes. In the first segment of the course, students will be introduced to the guiding principles of interpersonal mediation. A review of the theories of conflict, its roots and its resolution, set the stage for the role mediation can effectively play in resolving conflict. Students are introduced to the models of mediation and the benefits and challenges of each, including a comparative analysis of evaluative, facilitative and transformative styles of mediation. In the second segment, students will be assigned to mediate cases referred to the Scheinman Institute from the Office of the Judicial Administrator. The role of gender, race, culture, ethics and impasse in mediation will all be examined and incorporated into workshops and case studies. Students will have several opportunities to apply their knowledge of mediation and acquire the skills necessary to become effective mediators. Following each case assignment, students will be required to write a paper analyzing the nature of the complaint, the approach and techniques employed during the case and the student’s evaluation of what worked and did not work in their attempt to resolve the conflict. Oversight will be provided by the course instructors.