International & Comparative Labor (ILRIC)Industrial and Labor Relations

Showing 19 results.

Course descriptions provided by the Courses of Study 2020-2021.

ILRIC 2310

This course will look at multiple dimensions of work and labor from a sociological perspective. We will consider not only the large-scale processes that influence the structure and shape of work, but also ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 3 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18026ILRIC 2310  SEM 101

    • TRIves Hall 217
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ivory, T

  • Instruction Mode: In Person
    This course will look at multiple dimensions of work and labor from a sociological perspective. We will consider not only the large-scale processes that influence the structure and shape of work, but also how those processes and structures affect individual workers and the strategies that individuals and groups use to improve labor market outcomes. Crucial to this endeavor is an acknowledgement that outcomes differ drastically depending on the identities and positionality of workers and this will be reflected throughout course content. Major topics of inquiry will include classic and contemporary theories of work and labor markets, race and ethnicity, age, gender, sexuality, immigration, the role of unions and other worker collectives, and entrepreneurship.
    This course fulfills the ILR Advanced Writing requirement. Enrollment is restricted to ILR Sophomores and others with permission of the instructor.
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 3 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 19880ILRIC 2310  SEM 102

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ivory, T

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This course will look at multiple dimensions of work and labor from a sociological perspective. We will consider not only the large-scale processes that influence the structure and shape of work, but also how those processes and structures affect individual workers and the strategies that individuals and groups use to improve labor market outcomes. Crucial to this endeavor is an acknowledgement that outcomes differ drastically depending on the identities and positionality of workers and this will be reflected throughout course content. Major topics of inquiry will include classic and contemporary theories of work and labor markets, race and ethnicity, age, gender, sexuality, immigration, the role of unions and other worker collectives, and entrepreneurship.
    This course fulfills the ILR Advanced Writing requirement. Enrollment is restricted to ILR Sophomores and others with permission of the instructor.
    Enrollment limited to students who are unable to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

ILRIC 2350

Provides an introduction to how globalization is changing the nature of work, labor, and capital. It examines both contemporary and historical debates about globalization, but also covers a number ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 3 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 13143ILRIC 2350  LEC 001

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Batt, R

      Ivory, T

      Judd, J

      Kuruvilla, S

  • Instruction Mode: Online

ILRIC 2385

This course will explore key topics in the critical study of labor and capitalism through the lens of food. Questions of race, gender,and class, but also toxicity, settler colonialism, as well as production ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 3 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18027ILRIC 2385  SEM 101

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Besky, S

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This course fulfills the ILR Advanced Writing requirement. Enrollment is restricted to ILR Sophomores and others with permission of the instructor.
    In this course, we will explore critical, ethnographic, and historical forms of writing about three of the pillars of capitalism: money, work, and power. Though these pillars may seem self-explanatory, their meanings change depending on context. Focusing on work by anthropologists, geographers, and historians, we will learn how attention to context can help critically engage key concepts that animate the global economy. These concepts include ones about supply and demand, fair trade, meritocracy, debt, and even the “newness” of the so-called “new” economy of temporary and “gig” labor. To tie these themes together, students will develop a variety of writing skills. We begin with writing as a form of responsive reading. Here we will learn to use writing as a method of breaking complex ideas down into digestible parts. We will spend the middle portion of the semester discussing the essay as a form of structured argument. Here we will develop skills in comparing, contrasting, and synthesizing the arguments of others. Finally, we will practice writing as a form of narrating social life, or ethnography. Here, we will learn how to turn our own observations of the contemporary economy into original arguments, putting ourselves into conversation with other scholars.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 3 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 20798ILRIC 2385  SEM 102

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Besky, S

  • Instruction Mode: Online

ILRIC 3325

This course will explore key topics in the critical study of labor and capitalism through the lens of food. Questions of race, gender, and class, but also toxicity, settler colonialism, as well as production ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ANTHR 3325

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18046ILRIC 3325  LEC 001

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Besky, S

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This course will explore key topics in the critical study of labor and capitalism through the lens of food. Questions of race, gender, and class, but also toxicity, settler colonialism, as well as production and reproduction can all be read in the landscapes of food provision and procurement. Food is the ground for an array of labor processes—planting, harvesting, transporting, serving, and eating, just to name a few. Some of these forms of work are overt (stooped workers toiling in pesticide ridden field, for example). But some of these forms of work are invisible and unpaid. And sometimes, they are incredibly well remunerated but totally shadowy. By studying these different forms of work comparatively, we can understand genealogies and futures of inequality, resource use, and the nature of work itself.

ILRIC 3375

This course focuses on the evolution, current trajectories, and methods to improve labor practices in global supply chains. We will examine the key issue of why, after 25 years of corporate efforts and ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 5375

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18140ILRIC 3375  LEC 001

    • MWIves Hall 217
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Kuruvilla, S

  • Instruction Mode: Hybrid-Online and In Person
    Hybrid: rotational in person attendance to be determined by instructor.
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 5375

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 19882ILRIC 3375  LEC 002

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Kuruvilla, S

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    Enrollment limited to students who are unable to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

ILRIC 4367

This course will provide the student with an understanding of both classic and contemporary research and perspectives on migration and mobility, with special attention to how both inform labor market outcomes. ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 6367

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18050ILRIC 4367  LEC 001

    • TRIves Hall 217
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ivory, T

  • Instruction Mode: In Person
    This course will provide the student with an understanding of both classic and contemporary research and perspectives on migration and mobility, with special attention to how both inform labor market outcomes. Major topics of concern are how migration intersects with issues of law, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, education, employment discrimination, health, and social networks. Although course content will primarily focus on issues of migration impacting the United States, we will also consider contemporary migration issues of importance in other areas of the world.
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 6367

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 19883ILRIC 4367  LEC 002

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ivory, T

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This course will provide the student with an understanding of both classic and contemporary research and perspectives on migration and mobility, with special attention to how both inform labor market outcomes. Major topics of concern are how migration intersects with issues of law, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, education, employment discrimination, health, and social networks. Although course content will primarily focus on issues of migration impacting the United States, we will also consider contemporary migration issues of importance in other areas of the world.
    Enrollment limited to students who are unable to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

ILRIC 4390

No description available. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18054ILRIC 4390  LEC 001

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Bishara, D

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    The Arab uprisings of 2010/2011 brought renewed attention to the power of ordinary citizens to collectively overthrow their governments. Recent protest movements in the United States, Belarus, and Hong Kong underscore citizens’ ability to act collectively in pursuit of political change.This course introduces students to some of the core scholarship in the field of contentious politics by examining the politics of resistance, protest, and revolution. In doing so, the course addresses a range of questions: What tools do aggrieved citizens have to make claims against their governments, especially in non-democratic contexts? When and why do people act collectively to make those claims? How do governments respond to various forms of protest and how do those tactics affect future protest? Why do social movements emerge and what determines their success? How do we define revolutions? Why do some succeed, and others fail? Examples discussed include protest dynamics in Russia, and China, the civil rights movement in the United States, the Iranian revolution, the color revolutions in Eastern Europe and the Arab uprisings.

ILRIC 4395

The Chinese diaspora can be found in nearly every corner of the globe today. Although Chinese emigration accelerated under what came to be known as "globalization" in the late 20th century, in fact the ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: CAPS 3395ILRIC 6395

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18057ILRIC 4395  LEC 001

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Friedman, E

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    The Chinese diaspora can be found in nearly every corner of the globe today. Although Chinese emigration accelerated under what came to be known as “globalization” in the late 20th century, in fact the global movement of Chinese people is not a new phenomenon. This course will use both internal migration and global immigration as a lens for understanding China’s development, politics, and society more broadly. In focusing on the period from the mid-19th century to the present, we will see that the movement of Chinese people has both shaped, and been shaped by, colonialism, the global economy, and international politics.

ILRIC 4940

This capstone course is open to ILR Global Scholars (GS) during their last semester of their senior year. The course is designed for GS to incorporate their education and experience abroad with the concepts ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1 Credit GradeNoAud

  • 18059ILRIC 4940  SEM 101

    • MIves Hall 215
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Friedman, E

  • Instruction Mode: In Person
    This capstone course is open to ILR Global Scholars (GS) during their last semester of their senior year. The course is designed for GS to incorporate their education and experience abroad with the concepts and theories they have gained while at the ILR School. The overarching goal of this class is to bring GS together to collectively reflect on and identify key aspects of intercultural competency related to their personal and cultural growth, academic and professional development and roles as future global citizens. The structure of the course will be group discussions, peer review, and individual reflection papers. The final capstone reflection paper will fulfill the course requirement and the Global Scholars Program final reflection requirement.
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1 Credit GradeNoAud

  • 20994ILRIC 4940  SEM 102

    • MOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Friedman, E

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This capstone course is open to ILR Global Scholars (GS) during their last semester of their senior year. The course is designed for GS to incorporate their education and experience abroad with the concepts and theories they have gained while at the ILR School. The overarching goal of this class is to bring GS together to collectively reflect on and identify key aspects of intercultural competency related to their personal and cultural growth, academic and professional development and roles as future global citizens. The structure of the course will be group discussions, peer review, and individual reflection papers. The final capstone reflection paper will fulfill the course requirement and the Global Scholars Program final reflection requirement.

ILRIC 4970

All requests for permission to register for an internship must be approved by the faculty member who will supervise the project and the chairman of the faculty member's academic department before submission ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 21469ILRIC 4970  FLD 805

    • TBA
    • Skinner, L

  • Instruction Mode: Online

ILRIC 4990

For individual or group research projects conducted under the direction of a member of the ILR faculty, in a special area of labor relations not covered by regular course offerings. Sophomores, juniors, ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 21491ILRIC 4990  IND 604

    • TBA
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Staff

  • Instruction Mode: To Be Determined

ILRIC 5300

This course examines outsourcing decisions from a human resources perspective, and the human resource implications of managing workers in increasingly networked organizations. Outsourcing, offshoring, ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 13386ILRIC 5300  LEC 001

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Doellgast, V

  • Instruction Mode: Online

ILRIC 5310

In this class, we will compare case studies of labor union and other worker-led campaigns based on old and new forms of solidarity, both within countries and transnationally. Each week, we will discuss ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18033ILRIC 5310  SEM 101

    • TOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Doellgast, V

  • Instruction Mode: Online

ILRIC 5375

This course focuses on the evolution, current trajectories, and methods to improve labor practices in global supply chains. We will examine the key issue of why, after 25 years of corporate efforts and ... view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 3375

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18141ILRIC 5375  LEC 001

    • MWIves Hall 217
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Kuruvilla, S

  • Instruction Mode: Hybrid-Online and In Person
    Hybrid: rotational in person attendance to be determined by instructor.
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 3375

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 19884ILRIC 5375  LEC 002

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Kuruvilla, S

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    Enrollment limited to students who are unable to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

ILRIC 6350

The course covers three major topics: labor markets in the developing world, distribution and development: theory and evidence, and policies to deal with these issues. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18034ILRIC 6350  LEC 001

    • MOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Fields, G

  • Instruction Mode: Online

ILRIC 6367

This course will provide the student with an understanding of both classic and contemporary research and perspectives on migration and mobility, with special attention to how both inform labor market outcomes. ... view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 4367

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18052ILRIC 6367  LEC 001

    • TRIves Hall 217
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ivory, T

  • Instruction Mode: In Person
    This course will provide the student with an understanding of both classic and contemporary research and perspectives on migration and mobility, with special attention to how both inform labor market outcomes. Major topics of concern are how migration intersects with issues of law, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, education, employment discrimination, health, and social networks. Although course content will primarily focus on issues of migration impacting the United States, we will also consider contemporary migration issues of importance in other areas of the world.
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRIC 4367

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 19885ILRIC 6367  LEC 002

    • TROnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Ivory, T

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    This course will provide the student with an understanding of both classic and contemporary research and perspectives on migration and mobility, with special attention to how both inform labor market outcomes. Major topics of concern are how migration intersects with issues of law, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, education, employment discrimination, health, and social networks. Although course content will primarily focus on issues of migration impacting the United States, we will also consider contemporary migration issues of importance in other areas of the world.
    Enrollment limited to students who are unable to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

ILRIC 6395

The Chinese diaspora can be found in nearly every corner of the globe today. Although Chinese emigration accelerated under what came to be known as "globalization" in the late 20th century, in fact the ... view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: CAPS 3395ILRIC 4395

  • 4 Credits GradeNoAud

  • 18058ILRIC 6395  LEC 001

    • MWOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Friedman, E

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    The Chinese diaspora can be found in nearly every corner of the globe today. Although Chinese emigration accelerated under what came to be known as “globalization” in the late 20th century, in fact the global movement of Chinese people is not a new phenomenon. This course will use both internal migration and global immigration as a lens for understanding China’s development, politics, and society more broadly. In focusing on the period from the mid-19th century to the present, we will see that the movement of Chinese people has both shaped, and been shaped by, colonialism, the global economy, and international politics.

ILRIC 7710

Employee voice is an important focus of research in a range of fields, spanning Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Studies, and Employment Relations. In this graduate seminar, we will discuss different ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILROB 7710

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • 18036ILRIC 7710  SEM 101

    • FIves Hall 217
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Doellgast, V

      Hammer, T

  • Instruction Mode: In Person
    Employee voice is an important focus of research in a range of fields, spanning Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Studies, and Employment Relations. In this graduate seminar, we will discuss different theoretical and empirical approaches to studying employee voice, with the aim of developing a more integrative understanding of its causes and consequences. Under what conditions are employees more likely to communicate ideas, concerns, or suggestions? What institutional or organizational conditions support expanded employee participation in decision-making – within work groups, workplaces, organizations, and industries?¿ How are productivity or efficiency gains from expanded employee voice distributed? And under what conditions do they result in improvements in pay and working conditions? We will give particular attention to comparing Organizational Behavior and Employment Relations perspectives. Some sample topics include: organizational justice and voice; the psychology of silencing interest-group representation; harassment and mobbing; the psychology of negotiation; voice, silence, and diversity; high performance work systems; teams and direct participation; national institutions and democracy at work; unions and voice.¿
    Enrollment limited to students who are able to attend in-person classes in the Ithaca area.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILROB 7710

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • 20734ILRIC 7710  SEM 102

    • FOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • Doellgast, V

      Hammer, T

  • Instruction Mode: Online
    Employee voice is an important focus of research in a range of fields, spanning Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Studies, and Employment Relations. In this graduate seminar, we will discuss different theoretical and empirical approaches to studying employee voice, with the aim of developing a more integrative understanding of its causes and consequences. Under what conditions are employees more likely to communicate ideas, concerns, or suggestions? What institutional or organizational conditions support expanded employee participation in decision-making – within work groups, workplaces, organizations, and industries?¿ How are productivity or efficiency gains from expanded employee voice distributed? And under what conditions do they result in improvements in pay and working conditions? We will give particular attention to comparing Organizational Behavior and Employment Relations perspectives. Some sample topics include: organizational justice and voice; the psychology of silencing interest-group representation; harassment and mobbing; the psychology of negotiation; voice, silence, and diversity; high performance work systems; teams and direct participation; national institutions and democracy at work; unions and voice.¿

ILRIC 9800

Provides a forum for the presentation of current research being undertaken by faculty members and graduate students in the Department of International and Comparative Labor, and by invited guests. All ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: ILRLR 9800

  • 2 Credits S/U NoAud

  • 13475ILRIC 9800  SEM 101

    • WOnline Meeting
    • Feb 8 - May 14, 2021
    • McCarthy, J

  • Instruction Mode: Online