Philosophy (PHIL)Arts and Sciences

Showing 41 results.

Course descriptions provided by the Courses of Study 2019-2020.

PHIL 1100

A general introduction to some of the main topics, texts, and methods of philosophy. Topics may include the existence of God, the nature of mind and its relation to the body, causation, free will, knowledge ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion.

  • 3 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  5380PHIL 1100  LEC 001

    • MW
    • Fairbairn, F

  •  5381PHIL 1100  DIS 201

    • R
    • Staff

  •  5382PHIL 1100  DIS 202

    • F
    • Staff

  •  5383PHIL 1100  DIS 203

    • F
    • Staff

  •  5384PHIL 1100  DIS 204

    • F
    • Staff

  •  8639PHIL 1100  DIS 205

    • F
    • Staff

PHIL 1110

This First-Year Writing Seminar is about using philosophy and everyday life and provides the opportunity to write extensively about these issues.  Topics vary by section. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS:Problems in Applied Ethics

  • 17763PHIL 1110  SEM 101

    • TR
    • Esposito, A

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS: Free Will and the Self

  • 17764PHIL 1110  SEM 102

    • TR
    • Sales, B

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS: Environmental Ethics

  • 18409PHIL 1110  SEM 103

    • TR
    • Boeglin, A

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

PHIL 1111

This First-Year Writing Seminar discusses problems in philosophy and gives the opportunity to write about them.  Topics vary by section. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS:Philosophy of Science

  • 17765PHIL 1111  SEM 101

    • MWF
    • Fairbairn, F

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

PHIL 1112

This First-Year Writing Seminar offers the opportunity to discuss and write about philosophy.  Topics vary by section. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS: Reason and Belief in God

  • 17821PHIL 1112  SEM 101

    • TR
    • Da Vee, D

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS: Ethics of Dying in Ancient Philosophy

  • 17822PHIL 1112  SEM 102

    • MWF
    • Proios, J

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS: Borders, Immigration, and Citizenship

  • 17824PHIL 1112  SEM 104

    • TR
    • Yost, B

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   FWS Session. 

  • 3 Credits Graded

  • Topic: FWS: Virtue and the Good Life

  • 17825PHIL 1112  SEM 105

    • TR
    • Gounot, Q

  • For more information about First-Year Writing Seminars, see the Knight Institute website at http://knight.as.cornell.edu/.

PHIL 1910

This course provides an introduction to the science of the mind.  Everyone knows what it's like to think and perceive, but this subjective experience provides little insight into how minds emerge from ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •  7250PHIL 1910  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Swallow, K

PHIL 1911

This section is highly recommended for students who are interested in learning about the topics covered in the main course through writing and discussion.  view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: COGST 1104LING 1104PSYCH 1104

  • 1 Credit Stdnt Opt

  •  7810PHIL 1911  SEM 101

    • TBA
    • Swallow, K

PHIL 1920

This course offers a survey of political theory in the West. We will examine some of the persistent dilemmas of politics and the attempts of several canonical political theorists to respond to them: Plato, ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion. Combined with: GOVT 1615

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  8823PHIL 1920  LEC 001

    • MW
    • Markell, P

  •  9288PHIL 1920  DIS 201

    • T
    • Staff

  •  9289PHIL 1920  DIS 202

    • R
    • Staff

  •  9290PHIL 1920  DIS 203

    • R
    • Staff

  •  9291PHIL 1920  DIS 204

    • F
    • Staff

PHIL 2220

A survey of Western philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We focus largely on epistemology (ideas, skepticism, belief, knowledge, science) ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion.

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9378PHIL 2220  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Hubner, K

  •  9379PHIL 2220  DIS 201

    • W
    • Staff

  •  9380PHIL 2220  DIS 202

    • F
    • Staff

  •  9381PHIL 2220  DIS 203

    • F
    • Staff

PHIL 2300

This course will survey a number of famous paradoxes about the nature of time, identity, logic, science, belief, decision, and value. Some of these paradoxes have widely accepted answers, but many do not. ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion.

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9268PHIL 2300  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Kocurek, A

  •  9546PHIL 2300  DIS 201

    • F
    • Staff

  •  9547PHIL 2300  DIS 202

    • F
    • Staff

PHIL 2410

This will be a lecture course on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion.

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7942PHIL 2410  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Markovits, J

  •  7943PHIL 2410  DIS 201

    • F
    • Staff

  •  8458PHIL 2410  DIS 202

    • F
    • Staff

  •  8587PHIL 2410  DIS 203

    • F
    • Staff

PHIL 2415

This course is an introduction to the moral mind from philosophical and psychological perspectives. Many traditional philosophical problems about morality are being illuminated by current work in cognitive ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion. Combined with: PSYCH 2415

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16759PHIL 2415  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Nichols, S

  • 16760PHIL 2415  DIS 201

    • F
    • Nichols, S

  • 16761PHIL 2415  DIS 202

    • F
    • Nichols, S

  • 18393PHIL 2415  DIS 203

    • F
    • Nichols, S

PHIL 2530

What must (or could) God be like, and what reasons do we have for thinking that a being of that sort actually exists? What difference would (or could) the existence of God make to our lives? Religion & ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: 1 available
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: RELST 2630

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16767PHIL 2530  LEC 001

    • MW
    • MacDonald, S

PHIL 2945

This course examines the political theory of civil disobedience. Do citizens have obligations to obey unjust laws? What makes disobedience civil rather than criminal? How do acts of protest influence public ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion. Combined with: AMST 3785GOVT 3785

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 17273PHIL 2945  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Livingston, A

  • 17274PHIL 2945  DIS 201

    • W
    • Staff

  • 17275PHIL 2945  DIS 202

    • F
    • Staff

PHIL 2960

Politicians, scientists, and citizens worldwide face many environmental issues today, but they are neither simple nor straightforward. Moreover, there are many ways to understand how we have, do, and could ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion. Combined with: BSOC 2061STS 2061

  • 4 Credits Graded

  • 17640PHIL 2960  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Pritchard, S

  • 17641PHIL 2960  DIS 201

    • W
    • Pritchard, S

  • 17642PHIL 2960  DIS 202

    • W
    • Pritchard, S

  • 17643PHIL 2960  DIS 203

    • W
    • Pritchard, S

  • 17644PHIL 2960  DIS 204

    • W
    • Pritchard, S

PHIL 3180

Philosophical writings from 1885 to 1915, by Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell, among others. Topics: metaphysics, semantics, epistemology, and value theory. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16772PHIL 3180  LEC 001

    • MWF
    • Hodes, H

PHIL 3204

An examination of the doctrines of the Greek philosophers working in the three centuries after the death of Aristotle. Emphasis on Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Skepticism. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: CLASS 3661

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16280PHIL 3204  LEC 001

    • MW
    • Brittain, C

PHIL 3310

A mathematical study of the formal languages of standard first-order propositional and predicate logic, including their syntax, semantics, and deductive systems. The basic apparatus of model theory will ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Choose one lecture and one discussion. Combined with: MATH 2810

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9272PHIL 3310  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Hodes, H

  •  9490PHIL 3310  DIS 201

    • R
    • Staff

PHIL 3475

No description available. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16881PHIL 3475  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Yost, B

  • This course addresses central debates in the philosophy of legal punishment. We will analyze the leading theories of punishment, including the familiar retributivist and deterrent alternatives, as well as lesser-known hybrid, self-defense, and rehabilitative accounts. We will ask whether each theory offers a general justification for establishing institutions of punishment, and whether each theory justifies specific acts of punishment. Other topics may include criminal responsibility, the legitimacy of collateral consequences (e.g., the denial of felons’ voting rights), alternatives to punishment, etc.

PHIL 3900

To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6706PHIL 3900  IND 603

    • TBA
    • Brennan, T

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6707PHIL 3900  IND 605

    • TBA
    • Marmor, A

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6708PHIL 3900  IND 607

    • TBA
    • Hodes, H

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6709PHIL 3900  IND 608

    • TBA
    • Kosch, M

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6710PHIL 3900  IND 609

    • TBA
    • MacDonald, S

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6712PHIL 3900  IND 611

    • TBA
    • Pereboom, D

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6734PHIL 3900  IND 612

    • TBA
    • Silins, N

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6931PHIL 3900  IND 615

    • TBA
    • Starr, W

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6932PHIL 3900  IND 616

    • TBA
    • Kamtekar, R

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6933PHIL 3900  IND 617

    • TBA
    • Markovits, J

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7268PHIL 3900  IND 619

    • TBA
    • Manne, K

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7269PHIL 3900  IND 620

    • TBA
    • Manne, D

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Twelve Week. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 17129PHIL 3900  IND 601

    • TBA
    • Feb 3 - May 5, 2020
    • Nichols, S

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Twelve Week. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 17130PHIL 3900  IND 602

    • TBA
    • Feb 3 - May 5, 2020
    • Manne, D

PHIL 4002

Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •  6934PHIL 4002  SEM 101

    • TBA
    • MacDonald, S

PHIL 4110

Reading and translation of Greek philosophical texts. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: GREEK 7161PHIL 6010

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6967PHIL 4110  SEM 101

    • TBA
    • Brennan, T

PHIL 4200

Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: CLASS 4662CLASS 7173PHIL 6200

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7962PHIL 4200  SEM 101

    • T
    • Brennan, T

PHIL 4215

Advanced discussion of a topic in medieval philosophy. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: RELST 4215

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Aquinas

  • 18405PHIL 4215  LEC 001

    • TBA
    • MacDonald, S

PHIL 4220

Advanced discussion of topics or authors in "modern" Western philosophy (circa the 17th and 18th centuries). view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: JWST 4210JWST 6210PHIL 6220

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Spinoza on the Mind

  • 16822PHIL 4220  SEM 101

    • TR
    • Hubner, K

  • This course will focus on the work of the influential early modern Jewish philosopher, Baruch Spinoza, and in particular on his unorthodox views about the nature and scope of mindedness and thinking. Spinoza was a panpsychist: someone who holds that all things in nature -- even humble slugs -- think in some way and to some degree; he also held that all creaturely ideas (including human ideas) are just parts of a single, infinite, cosmic intellect; finally, he held that being thought about is a particular way of having existence, such that whenever I think about my cat, for example, this very cat comes to exist as a purely mental object, in addition to already existing as a furry, meowing, spatio-temporal creature. In addition to looking at these puzzling theses, we will also investigate how Spinoza understood intentionality (or thought's directedness at objects) more generally; how he understood what it takes to form an idea; how ideas represent or fail to represent things; the relation between creaturely minds and the divine intellect; and the relation between being and thought on the cosmic level. We will also spend time examining Spinoza's debt to his medieval Jewish philosophers, notably Maimonides and Gersonides, as well as Spinoza's influence on late 19th century and early 20th Idealists, who were drawn to Spinoza's philosophy by the central place it assigns to thought in nature.

PHIL 4611

No description available. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: PHIL 6611

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Relation between Knowledge & Action

  • 18092PHIL 4611  SEM 101

    • R
    • Pavese, C

PHIL 4620

Advanced discussion of a topic in Philosophy of Mind. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: COGST 6620PHIL 6620

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Moral Learning

  • 16851PHIL 4620  SEM 101

    • M
    • Nichols, S

PHIL 4710

An investigation of varying topics in the philosophy of language including reference, meaning, the relationship between language and thought, communication, modality, logic and pragmatics. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: LING 4712LING 6634PHIL 6710

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9336PHIL 4710  SEM 101

    • W
    • Kocurek, A

      Starr, W

PHIL 4720

What is the relationship between what words mean and how they are used? What is part of the grammar and what is a result of general reasoning? Pragmatics is often thought of as the study of how meaning ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •  7662PHIL 4720  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Murray, S

PHIL 4901

Majors in philosophy may choose to pursue honors in their senior year. Students undertake research leading to the writing of an honors essay by the end of the final semester. Prospective candidates should ... view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6699PHIL 4901  IND 603

    • TBA
    • Brennan, T

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6701PHIL 4901  IND 607

    • TBA
    • Hodes, H

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6702PHIL 4901  IND 608

    • TBA
    • Kosch, M

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6703PHIL 4901  IND 609

    • TBA
    • MacDonald, S

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6705PHIL 4901  IND 611

    • TBA
    • Pereboom, D

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6735PHIL 4901  IND 612

    • TBA
    • Sethi, N

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6736PHIL 4901  IND 613

    • TBA
    • Silins, N

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6737PHIL 4901  IND 614

    • TBA
    • Sturgeon, N

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  6738PHIL 4901  IND 615

    • TBA
    • Marmor, A

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  7214PHIL 4901  IND 617

    • TBA
    • Manne, D

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  7273PHIL 4901  IND 618

    • TBA
    • Kamtekar, R

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  7274PHIL 4901  IND 619

    • TBA
    • Manne, K

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  7275PHIL 4901  IND 620

    • TBA
    • Starr, W

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  8750PHIL 4901  IND 621

    • TBA
    • Kocurek, A

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  8760PHIL 4901  IND 622

    • TBA
    • Atiq, E

PHIL 6010

Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts. view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: GREEK 7161PHIL 4110

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6968PHIL 6010  SEM 101

    • TBA
    • Brennan, T

PHIL 6020

Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts. view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •  6928PHIL 6020  SEM 101

    • TBA
    • MacDonald, S

PHIL 6200

Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy. view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: CLASS 4662CLASS 7173PHIL 4200

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Platonism after Plato

  •  7963PHIL 6200  SEM 101

    • T
    • Brennan, T

PHIL 6220

Advanced discussion of topics or authors in "modern" Western philosophy (circa the 17th and 18th centuries). view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: JWST 4210JWST 6210PHIL 4220

  • 4 Credits Sat/Unsat

  • Topic: Spinoza on the Mind

  • 16946PHIL 6220  SEM 101

    • TR
    • Hubner, K

  • This course will focus on the work of the influential early modern Jewish philosopher, Baruch Spinoza, and in particular on his unorthodox views about the nature and scope of mindedness and thinking. Spinoza was a panpsychist: someone who holds that all things in nature -- even humble slugs -- think in some way and to some degree; he also held that all creaturely ideas (including human ideas) are just parts of a single, infinite, cosmic intellect; finally, he held that being thought about is a particular way of having existence, such that whenever I think about my cat, for example, this very cat comes to exist as a purely mental object, in addition to already existing as a furry, meowing, spatio-temporal creature. In addition to looking at these puzzling theses, we will also investigate how Spinoza understood intentionality (or thought's directedness at objects) more generally; how he understood what it takes to form an idea; how ideas represent or fail to represent things; the relation between creaturely minds and the divine intellect; and the relation between being and thought on the cosmic level. We will also spend time examining Spinoza's debt to his medieval Jewish philosophers, notably Maimonides and Gersonides, as well as Spinoza's influence on late 19th century and early 20th Idealists, who were drawn to Spinoza's philosophy by the central place it assigns to thought in nature.

PHIL 6410

Graduate seminar covering a topic in ethics and value theory. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16837PHIL 6410  SEM 101

    • W
    • Markovits, J

PHIL 6611

No description available. view course details

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Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: PHIL 4611

  • 4 Credits Sat/Unsat

  • Topic: Relation between Knowledge & Action

  • 16825PHIL 6611  SEM 101

    • R
    • Pavese, C

  • Spring 2020: An advanced introduction to action theory, focusing on the relation between knowledge and action

PHIL 6620

Advanced discussion of a topic in Philosophy of Mind. view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: COGST 6620PHIL 4620

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • Topic: Moral Learning

  • 16854PHIL 6620  SEM 101

    • M
    • Nichols, S

PHIL 6710

An investigation of varying topics in the philosophy of language including reference, meaning, the relationship between language and thought, communication, modality, logic and pragmatics. view course details

View Enrollment Information

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: LING 4712LING 6634PHIL 4710

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9338PHIL 6710  SEM 101

    • W
    • Kocurek, A

      Starr, W

PHIL 6720

What is the relationship between what words mean and how they are used?  What is part of the grammar and what is a result of general reasoning?  Pragmatics is often thought of as the study of how meaning ... view course details

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Syllabi: none
  •  7664PHIL 6720  LEC 001

    • TR
    • Murray, S

PHIL 6731

Uses the techniques introduced in Semantics I to analyze linguistic phenomena, including quantifier scope, ellipsis, and referential pronouns. Temporal and possible worlds semantics are introduced and ... view course details

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Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: LING 6422

  • 4 Credits Graded

  •  8151PHIL 6731  LEC 001

    • MW
    • Mendia, J

PHIL 6740

Addresses current theoretical and empirical issues in semantics. view course details

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Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session.  Combined with: LING 7711

  • 4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  • 16829PHIL 6740  SEM 101

    • T
    • Murray, S

PHIL 7000

Independent study for graduate students only. view course details

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Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6740PHIL 7000  IND 603

    • TBA
    • Brennan, T

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6742PHIL 7000  IND 607

    • TBA
    • Hodes, H

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6743PHIL 7000  IND 608

    • TBA
    • Kosch, M

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6744PHIL 7000  IND 609

    • TBA
    • MacDonald, S

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6848PHIL 7000  IND 611

    • TBA
    • Pereboom, D

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6850PHIL 7000  IND 613

    • TBA
    • Silins, N

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  6852PHIL 7000  IND 615

    • TBA
    • Marmor, A

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9569PHIL 7000  IND 616

    • TBA
    • Kocurek, A

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7287PHIL 7000  IND 617

    • TBA
    • Manne, K

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7288PHIL 7000  IND 618

    • TBA
    • Starr, W

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7289PHIL 7000  IND 619

    • TBA
    • Manne, D

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7290PHIL 7000  IND 620

    • TBA
    • Kamtekar, R

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  7781PHIL 7000  IND 621

    • TBA
    • Markovits, J

Enrollment Information
Syllabi: none
  •   Regular Academic Session. 

  • 1-4 Credits Stdnt Opt

  •  9570PHIL 7000  IND 622

    • TBA
    • Atiq, E